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On Demand CE/CME Webinars from Addiction Experts

Monday, October 23, 2017  
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On Demand CE/CME Webinars from Addiction Experts

 

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On Demand CE/CME Webinars

 

 

Erica Ghignone, MD

Erica Ghignone, MD

Addiction Psychiatry Fellow
Northwestern University
Chicago, IL


Women and Addiction

Register 1 CE Credit

It is well known that the rates of alcohol and substance use disorders are higher in men than women. The gender gap, however, has been narrowing consistently in the recent decades, especially among the younger generations. Women have been noted to have a faster disease progression compared to men, differing patterns of comorbid psychiatric disorders including a higher prevalence of trauma and mood disorders, and unique needs when it comes to treatment. This presentation examines the epidemiology, etiology, treatment outcomes as well as risk factors specific to women in order to better understand this growing problem. Substance use in pregnant women, its neonatal effects and treatment options is also discussed in brief.

 

Bertha Madras

Bertha Madras, PhD

Professor of Psychobiology, Harvard Medical School, Harvard University

Member, RiverMend Health Scientific Advisory Board

Neurobiology of Addiction

Register 1 CME Credit

The neurobiology of addiction increasingly is thought to involve a weakening of disruption of brain circuits that link judgment and impulse control to reward systems and emotional responses. An overview of these concepts and how they’ve been derived will be presented. Cannabinoid signaling is an ancient, complex, system present in many regions of the brain and in peripheral organs.

Accordingly, it is not surprising that marijuana affects many brain and bodily functions, and can become addictive over time. Recent data suggest that the addiction prevalence among marijuana users in the United States has increased markedly, possibly reflecting higher potency, higher rates of frequent use and decreased perception of harm. Recent insights into marijuana and opioids biology indicate they “cross-talk”, which conceivably may confer risk for those exposed to marijuana prenatally or during the adolescent period. The adolescent brain appears to be more susceptible to the adverse effects of drugs than more nature brains. This segment will highlight the increased risks and some potential mechanisms.

 

Leslie Kaplan, MD

Leslie Kaplan, MD

Dr. Kaplan is a pediatrician specializing in adolescent and young adult medicine, with over 15 years of experience serving the special medical needs of patients with eating disorders.

Beyond the Brain: Medical Consequences of Eating Disorders

Register 1 CE Credit

Eating disorders have the highest mortality rate and one of the highest morbidity rates of any psychological disease. Chronic and severe eating disorder behaviors can affect virtually every organ system, and the list of potential medical complications is extensive. Complications of binge eating disorder tend to mirror those of obesity and overweight. Complications of bulimia nervosa are generally related to the method of purging. Medical sequelae of anorexia nervosa stem from starvation and weight loss. This course seeks to familiarize eating disorder professionals with these medical complications and the value of good medical care, not only to keep their clients safe, but to allow them to participate optimally in the therapeutic process.

 

Marc N. Potenzo, MD, PhD

MarcN. Potenza, MD, PhD

Professor and Director, Center of Excellence in Gambling Research; Director, Yale Program for Research on Impulsivity and Impulse Control Disorders; Director, Women and Addictive Disorders, Women’s Health Research at Yale, School of Medicine

Member, RiverMend Health Scientific Advisory Board

Gambling, Gaming, Food,Process Addictions: Diagnosis and Treatment

Register 1 CME Credit

Over the past several decades, significant advances have been made with respect to our understanding of the etiology, course and clinical characteristics of pathological gambling. During the DSM-5 process, pathological gambling was renamed as gambling disorder and reclassified from an impulse control disorder to an addictive disorder, substantiating the notion of non-substance or behavioral addictions.

While Internet-related behaviors were considered and research diagnostic criteria for Internet gaming disorder generated and included in section 3 of DSM-5, the Committee believed that additional data were needed prior to introducing such a disorder into the main text of DSM-5. As ICD-11 preparations are underway, there exists debate about how best to classify these and other conditions that may be considered impulse control or addictive disorders. Thispresentationfocuseson relevant processes related to these issues in DSM-5 and ICD-11.

 

Lauren Pace, DO

Lauren Pace, DO

Addiction Psychiatry Fellow
University of Illinois
Chicago, IL

Synthetic Cannabinoids: An Overview

Register 1 CE Credit

Synthetic Cannabinoids (SCs) have become widely abused as recreational drugs and are now known to carry a risk of severe mental and physical health effects. SCs mimic the psychoactive effects of cannabis and have been recognized as drugs of abuse since 2008. However, SCs differ structurally from cannabis, which may explain the emergence of severe psychiatric symptoms following SC ingestion. This presentation examines catatonia occurring in the context of SC use in two patients with no prior history of psychosis. Pharmacological management in the context of SC induced catatonia is also discussed, as well as long term sequelae of heavy synthetic cannabinoid use.

 

The RiverMend Health Institute

offers continuing medical education from the nation’s leading experts in addiction medicine and eating disorders. By providing the latest evidence-based research and clinically relevant information, the RiverMend Health Institute supports research, education and treatment of patients suffering from behavioral health issues such as substance use disorder, anorexia, bulimia and binge eating. Accredited CME and CE activities include live events, webinars, and newsletters that enhance professional development and clinical practice to improve patient care. Please see course listings for detailed information for all activities.

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